WRITER’S CONUNDRUM: GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT FRANKENSTEIN

Art versus the science of writing

Art versus science
(That’s me, on the right)

I don’t attend writing workshops. I don’t want a book on “Writing for Dummies.”

I do read author blogs and I do educate myself on writing great dialogues and the like – but not TOO much.

The reason? I have this awkward fear it will ruin my writing. Sure, learning more about plots and denouement and killer endings would improve my writing. I know this. But wouldn’t it take the fun out of writing if I tried too hard? Moreover – and here is the crux of the matter – would it change my writing? Would my writing become less like one of my own flesh-and-blood children and more like a grammatically correct Frankenstein?

If I know too much about themes, antagonists, and symbolism, will the fun be sucked out of stories like the vampires that my English teachers proved to be? To put it in Hollywood terms: if I know how the special effects crew create a compelling scene, the magic of the movie is lost forever.

What do you think? I’d love to hear from you, even if you are an English teacher, as long as you promise to refrain from biting my jugular.

Keep writing & keep sharing! – Cronin Detzz

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4 thoughts on “WRITER’S CONUNDRUM: GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT FRANKENSTEIN

  1. Yes!! I completely agree. In fact, I’ve been planning on a similar blog topic at some point in the future. Other than my high school creative writing class and a couple of open creative writing courses at a city college, I’ve gone out of my way to avoid being burdened with most so-called writing “rules.” Yes, learning too much about writing sucks the fun out of it. And if you’re not connecting with your writing, your work will be missing a piece of its heart. When it comes down to it, the only rule should be that your readers enjoy your story.
    Thanks for this! I’ve been wondering for a long time if I’m the only one who feels this way.

  2. I am an English teacher, but I agree–not to the point that we don’t need no education. Still, there needs to be room for style–especially with dialogue. I can’t stop using dashes, but that’s how a lot of people talk. I cut down on them in later drafts because know I use them too liberally, but many survive the great purge. …so do elipses…

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